Toxic behaviours in romantic relationships are often tolerated

Categorized as Dating, Health, Love and Sex, Marriage, Other girly Stuff, Relationship Advice, Relationships, Women Career
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Let’s talk about the unhealthy habits of dating and relationships that people tend to accept as normal. Is your relationship toxic? How are you going to discover this? There are unhealthy connections in some partnerships as well. In other relationships, the hostile climate between the participants led to a lack of success. When you first start dating someone, you get the warm and fuzzy feeling that everything is going to be alright. However, this can occasionally change over time, and the relationship changes as a result. It might be difficult to tell if you’re in a toxic relationship while you’re in one. How can you know whether a relationship is toxic? According to a layman’s definition, “toxic relationships” are those in which both parties have a dissatisfaction with the relationship because of inappropriate behaviour, constant disputes, and lack of tranquilly. While in love, you may not be able to tell if your relationship is adopting harmful behaviours. You may be happy at first, but it’s too late by the time you realise how much you’ve been sacrificing by putting up with the bad behaviour in the first place. In this blog post, we’ll examine eight of the most toxic patterns of romantic attachment that people mistakenly believe to be perfectly normal and acceptable. Almost every couple has had to deal with one or more of these habits at some point throughout their relationship. The majority of the time, undesirable patterns of behaviour in love relationships don’t bother individuals. However, over time, these behaviours damage relationships. Think about them if you want to stop them and prolong your relationship. The first step is to talk about these behaviours and why they are bad for a relationship. When it comes to toxic dating practises, one of the most generally held beliefs is that they’re totally normal. It’s not a good idea to monitor your spouse’s every move, or to ask your partner to do so. If you or your partner exhibit this behaviour, it shows a lack of trust on your part or theirs. You’re not being courteous if you don’t even admit that your partner may need some privacy. Love gives you the freedom to indulge in such behaviour, so you may not consider it a negative habit at all. You have total control over your spouse’s phone, so you can see where he or she is going and what he or she is doing. Rather than for every small thing you do, this should only be done out of true love on rare occasions. Irrespective of how much your spouse may initially enjoy this, he or she will soon get irritated and suspicious that you lack faith in them. Because of this, problems in interpersonal relationships have arisen. People I know say that their partners are notoriously strict when it comes to keeping track of their money and managing the home. To put it another way, you may wind up destroying your relationship if you don’t stop this harmful habit. Blaming What percentage of the time do you put the blame on your partner? When things go wrong, it’s common for partners to place the blame on the other person. You may think it doesn’t, but do you truly believe that? I think you’re right. When we make a mistake in a relationship, we tend to blame the other person for it. This is how the human brain is set up. For example, if your spouse forgot to say “Happy Birthday” to you on your birthday, they will always be reminded of the incident. It’s possible that your girlfriend is willing to make an apology if you cheated on her. Even if the split was your fault, she will always hold you accountable for it. She cannot tolerate the thought of being misled. When you’re in a long-term relationship or marriage, it’s impossible to resist the temptation to point the finger. To preserve a good relationship, you cannot adopt the practise of blaming, even if you are incredibly cautious. In spite of this, you’ll get away with it. However, if you keep blaming each other for everything, your relationship is going to suffer in the long term. Jealousy Your lover is talking excessively to another person. How do you feel? Or, do you frequently express your admiration for their good looks? In a committed relationship, jealousy is a normal part of the dynamic. According to most couples, if there isn’t any jealousy in their relationship, there isn’t a lot of “love” or “passion” in their relationship either. Excessive jealousy, on the other hand, is never a good thing. The long-term consequences will be detrimental to both your relationship and your well-being. Envy can afflict you whether you’re conversing with friends or your sweetheart, for example. When his jealousy gets out of hand, he restricts your freedom. It is possible for jealousy to become corrosive and even dangerous if it isn’t reined in early enough. Emotional Blackmail Emotional blackmail, which many people consider acceptable in toxic relationships, is one of the most prevalent damaging behaviours. Emotional blackmail is commonly used as a technique to attain a desired outcome when someone is desperate enough. You have the right to leave a relationship if it’s not working for you. It was understandable for your spouse to respond the way she did when you told her what you were thinking. After she broke up with you emotionally, you began to feel bad and ponder reconnecting. We all resort to emotional blackmail at least once in every relationship, which isn’t detrimental. While it may be tempting to use emotional blackmail as a way to control your spouse, it’s best to avoid doing so if you want to maintain a healthy relationship with your partner. When compared to similar situations, it’s common for people to compare their relationships with other people. “Comparing ourselves to others” is something we never do in my marriage. Even if you and your partner had a fantastic time together, comparing yourself to someone else is so toxic that it will ruin everything. To put your partner in the context of others, you’ll likely agree. If the comparison brings out something nice in your partner, it will be beneficial to your relationship. It’s fine to compare your spouse to someone else, but only if you’re doing so in order to disparage them. Because that individual is a close friend and you’re using the comparison to encourage your spouse to start working out, you’re not doing any harm. You shouldn’t let your XYZ buddy’s salary be compared to your partner’s all the time, because that would be insulting and hurt your relationship. Those who are able to control their emotions and keep their tongues quiet will never jeopardise their relationship by insulting their spouse. For the most part, everyone can agree that it’s a good idea. Lying We all know that lying is wrong, and it’s our responsibility to cease doing it. We teach our children from an early age that lying is never okay. When it comes to relationships, some people tell one another the truth in order to keep their partners happy. To put it another way, don’t spill the beans to each other about what you’re doing. Deception in a love relationship may be tolerated by some. If you want to avoid conflict, you may disclose the truth to avoid a fight between you and your spouse. For example, if you asked your husband to call someone, but they declined, he may say he didn’t have their phone number on him. They’re considered “normal” since they’re so casual. Everything You’ve Done for Your Partner I’ve done so much to help you. I’ve done so much for you in the past. You are nothing without me. Assuming you’ve done anything kind in the past, you may have made your spouse feel entitled to something back from you. This should not have happened in a loving relationship; partners should not treat each other in this manner. You should keep a record of everything you’ve done for someone to show how much you care about what you’ve done for them, not simply how much you love them. Depriving Your Spouse of Financial Security ” In a partnership, financial independence is a must. Everyone should be financially independent of each other. Not every couple feels comfortable sharing their wealth in multiple relationships. This may rapidly turn into an issue for a relationship if there is no long-term financial preparation in place. Couples’ financial concerns are rarely mentioned in countries like India. Rather than relying on their husbands’ money to run the household, women in patriarchal nations are comfortable with not earning a penny. As time goes on, women are growing more and more concerned about their financial well-being as time goes on, and this is a regular occurrence. Sadly, the majority of individuals fail to see it as a potential source of conflict in their personal relationships and marriages. Things that are considered “normal” in relationships might in fact be destructive to our health and well-being. Because of these relationship patterns in mind, it may be possible to enhance your relationship.


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